How to Target My Resume for Multiple Jobs

How to Target My Resume for Multiple Jobs

Sending out generic resumes to dozens of companies never worked in the past, and it especially won’t work in today’s job searching climate. However, you may have just spent hundreds of dollars on a professionally crafted resume or spent as many hours creating one yourself and cannot invest that much time or money on one for every position for which you are applying. So, how do you take your final executive resume and use it to apply for multiple jobs, let alone match it to various job descriptions? Here are some tips to consider when writing those resumes.

Building Trust Through Behavioral Integrity

Building Trust Through Behavioral Integrity

Cornell University professor Dr. Tony Simons’ powerful article, “The High Cost of Lost Trust,” appeared in the Harvard Business Review in 2002. In that piece, he described his team’s efforts to examine a specific hypothesis (“Employee commitment drives customer service”) in the US operations of a major hotel chain. They interviewed over 7,000 employees at nearly 80 properties and found that employee commitment drives customer service, but, most critically, a leader’s behavioral integrity drives that and more.

Leading the Front—from Behind

Leading the Front—from Behind

This was indeed a light moment in a remarkably successful evening for all those associated with the making of a movie that also took home the Best Picture Award. The lesson in the quotation, however, may be that while we all want to be in front, we may have a greater responsibility to step back as we achieve more. This becomes an ever-stronger, growing desire as we become more accomplished in our careers through the various roles we have developed ourselves for. Indeed, an organization is formed when talented individuals come together to contribute their talents toward a common goal.

How to Write a Resume (When You Think You Have No Relevant Work Experience)

How to Write a Resume (When You Think You Have No Relevant Work Experience)

If you’re feeling unappreciated and underutilized in your current job, you’re not alone. According to the Conference Board, nearly half of all American workers report some degree of dissatisfaction at work, particularly in the areas of professional development, recognition, and promotion — all good reasons to consider changing employers or even industries.

Benefits of a Lateral Transfer

Benefits of a Lateral Transfer

A lateral transfer refers to when an employee moves from one position to another position at the same pay grade within an organization. Although this isn’t the same as upward mobility, such as a promotion, it does offer some unique benefits to both the employee and the organization. Following are three benefits of a lateral transfer.

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